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293 pages

Lolita of Lapland

Lapin Lolita

A wild, grotesque carnival of the flesh enveloped in multiple layers of paradoxical humanity.

Lolita of Lapland is a camera zooming in on the reader, on each of us. It’s a novel about whores, sexuality, and our longing for love.

Irene turns 18 and runs away from her native Lapland to Helsinki, where she takes up a room at a hostel and starts auctioning her virginity online. Russian-Estonian stripper-prostitute Nadja daydreams of a peaceful life in Finland.

The CEO is a client looking for the innocence of youth. Can it be bought?

Lolita of Lapland is a shameless novel about indecent women, innocence, money, and flesh.


Praise for the Work

“The text at the bottom of the cover says: ‘If you’ve had to weed out the whores from the flowerbed, you know what it means to dig deep in the weeds.’ The Slunga@Seppänen duo dig so deep it’s incredible. The starting setup is already so wild and impossible that I didn’t think there was any way the young women could get through the task they’d set out to accomplish. But they do get through it, and with finesse. The text oscillates between raw and gentle, multidimensionally, like they do in good movies, simultaneously showing mercy to no one or leaving no one unforgiven. In Nabokov’s Lolita, a girl of 12 summers vindicates an infatuated older man. In Lolita of Lapland, all the characters are adults, controlled by their instincts and dreaming of something that does not come true. It is a story, told more directly, harshly and obscenely than usual, about what we really are. The flowerbed of whores has truly been weeded clean. A remarkable work.” – Eeli Aalto, TV film director, Artist

Lolita of Lapland? What a clever move! (…) But what exactly is “bitch lit”? The way I understand it, it is literature written by women in which women take the initiative and take matters into their own hands. A male-blasting world view is typical of the genre, which also avoids the high-brow characteristics of literary fiction. Bitch lit rebels in that it does not seek to be well-written prose. I have yet to be immersed in the secrets of the bitch lit genre, but Slunga and Seppänen break away from the definitions above. (…) The duo of Slunga and Seppänen describe sex in a stylish and skilful manner. (…) The novel has nuance and humour. – Olavi Jama, Kaleva

“Lolita of Lapland is a special case for a Finnish novel. It was written by two women, the story involves auctioning off one’s virginity and it manages to accomplish one of the hardest tasks in fiction: to talk about sex and sexuality in a way that is both obscene and funny.” – Radio Helsinki


Materials available

Finnish edition
English extract
Review in English